The documentation below is the standard code style for all official Grind projects. Of course, there’s no requirement to use it in your own projects, but when contributing code to the Grind packages, please adhere to this standard.

You can find eslint settings for Grind at github.com/grindjs/eslint-config-grind.

The style guide has been ported and modified from the Airbnb JavaScript Style Guide to reflect Grind’s style.

Why? This ensures that you can’t reassign your references, which can lead to bugs and difficult to comprehend code.

// bad
var a = 1
var b = 2
 
// good
const a = 1
const b = 2

Why? let is block-scoped rather than function-scoped like var.

// bad
var count = 1
if (true) {
  count += 1
}
 
// good, use the let.
let count = 1
if (true) {
  count += 1
}

// const and let only exist in the blocks they are defined in.
{
  let a = 1
  const b = 1
}
console.log(a) // ReferenceError
console.log(b) // ReferenceError

// bad
const item = new Object()
 
// good
const item = {}

Why? They allow you to define all the properties of an object in one place.

function getKey(k) {
  return `a key named ${k}`
}
 
// bad
const obj = {
  id: 5,
  name: 'San Francisco',
}
obj[getKey('enabled')] = true
 
// good
const obj = {
  id: 5,
  name: 'San Francisco',
  [getKey('enabled')]: true,
}

// bad
const atom = {
  value: 1,
 
  addValue: function (value) {
    return atom.value + value
  },
}
 
// good
const atom = {
  value: 1,
 
  addValue(value) {
    return atom.value + value
  },
}

Why? It is shorter to write and descriptive.

const lukeSkywalker = 'Luke Skywalker'
 
// bad
const obj = {
  lukeSkywalker: lukeSkywalker,
}
 
// good
const obj = { lukeSkywalker }

Why? It’s easier to tell which properties are using the shorthand.

const anakinSkywalker = 'Anakin Skywalker'
const lukeSkywalker = 'Luke Skywalker'
 
// bad
const obj = {
  episodeOne: 1,
  twoJediWalkIntoACantina: 2,
  lukeSkywalker,
  episodeThree: 3,
  mayTheFourth: 4,
  anakinSkywalker,
}
 
// good
const obj = {
  lukeSkywalker,
  anakinSkywalker,
  episodeOne: 1,
  twoJediWalkIntoACantina: 2,
  episodeThree: 3,
  mayTheFourth: 4,
}

Why? In general we consider it subjectively easier to read. It improves syntax highlighting, and is also more easily optimized by many JS engines.

// bad
const bad = {
  'foo': 3,
  'bar': 4,
  'data-blah': 5,
}
 
// good
const good = {
  'foo': 3,
  'bar': 4,
  'data-blah': 5,
}

Why? These methods may be shadowed by properties on the object in question - consider { hasOwnProperty: false } - or, the object may be a null object (Object.create(null)).

// bad
console.log(object.hasOwnProperty(key))
 
// good
console.log(Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(object, key))
 
// best
const has = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty // cache the lookup once, in module scope.
console.log(has.call(object, key))

Object.assign to shallow-copy objects. Use the object rest operator to get a new object with certain properties omitted.

// very bad
const original = { a: 1, b: 2 }
const copy = Object.assign(original, { c: 3 }) // this mutates `original` ಠ_ಠ
delete copy.a // so does this
 
// bad
const original = { a: 1, b: 2 }
const copy = Object.assign({}, original, { c: 3 }) // copy => { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
 
// good
const original = { a: 1, b: 2 }
const copy = { ...original, c: 3 } // copy => { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
const { a, ...noA } = copy // noA => { b: 2, c: 3 }

// bad
const items = new Array()
 
// good
const items = []

Array#push instead of direct assignment to add items to an array.

const someStack = []
 
// bad
someStack[someStack.length] = 'abracadabra'
 
// good
someStack.push('abracadabra')

// very bad
const len = items.length
const itemsCopy = []
let i
 
for (= 0; i < len; i += 1) {
  itemsCopy[i] = items[i]
}
 
// bad
const itemsCopy = items.slice()
 
// good
const itemsCopy = [...items]

Array.from.

const foo = document.querySelectorAll('.foo')
 
// good
const nodes = Array.from(foo)
 
// best
const nodes = [...foo]

// bad
const baz = [...foo].map(bar)
 
// good
const baz = Array.from(foo, bar)

// good
;[1, 2, 3]
  .map(x => {
    const y = x + 1
    return x * y
  })
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(x => x + 1)
 
// bad - no returned value means `memo` becomes undefined after the first iteration
const flat = {}[([0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5])].reduce((memo, item, index) => {
  const flatten = memo.concat(item)
  memo[index] = flatten
})
 
// good
const flat = {}[([0, 1], [2, 3], [4, 5])].reduce((memo, item, index) => {
  const flatten = memo.concat(item)
  memo[index] = flatten
  return flatten
})
 
// bad
inbox.filter(msg => {
  const { subject, author } = msg
 
  if (subject === 'Mockingbird') {
    return author === 'Harper Lee'
  } else {
    return false
  }
})
 
// good
inbox.filter(msg => {
  const { subject, author } = msg
 
  if (subject === 'Mockingbird') {
    return author === 'Harper Lee'
  }
 
  return false
})

// bad
const arr = [
  [0, 1],
  [2, 3],
  [4, 5],
]
 
const objectInArray = [
  {
    id: 1,
  },
  {
    id: 2,
  },
]
 
const numberInArray = [1, 2]
 
// good
const arr = [
  [0, 1],
  [2, 3],
  [4, 5],
]
 
const objectInArray = [
  {
    id: 1,
  },
  {
    id: 2,
  },
]
 
const numberInArray = [1, 2]
 
const numberInArray = [1, 2]

Why? Destructuring saves you from creating temporary references for those properties.

// bad
function getFullName(user) {
  const firstName = user.firstName
  const lastName = user.lastName
 
  return `${firstName} ${lastName}`
}
 
// good
function getFullName(user) {
  const { firstName, lastName } = user
  return `${firstName} ${lastName}`
}
 
// best
function getFullName({ firstName, lastName }) {
  return `${firstName} ${lastName}`
}

const arr = [1, 2, 3, 4]
 
// bad
const first = arr[0]
const second = arr[1]
 
// good
const [first, second] = arr

Why? You can add new properties over time or change the order of things without breaking call sites.

// bad
function processInput(input) {
  // then a miracle occurs
  return [left, right, top, bottom]
}
 
// the caller needs to think about the order of return data
const [left, __, top] = processInput(input)
 
// good
function processInput(input) {
  // then a miracle occurs
  return { left, right, top, bottom }
}
 
// the caller selects only the data they need
const { left, top } = processInput(input)

// bad
const name = 'Capt. Janeway'
 
// bad - template literals should contain interpolation or newlines
const name = `Capt. Janeway`
 
// good
const name = 'Capt. Janeway'

Why? Broken strings are painful to work with and make code less searchable.

// bad
const errorMessage =
  'This is a super long error that was thrown because \
of Batman. When you stop to think about how Batman had anything to do \
with this, you would get nowhere \
fast.'
 
// bad
const errorMessage =
  'This is a super long error that was thrown because ' +
  'of Batman. When you stop to think about how Batman had anything to do ' +
  'with this, you would get nowhere fast.'
 
// good
const errorMessage =
  'This is a super long error that was thrown because of Batman. When you stop to think about how Batman had anything to do with this, you would get nowhere fast.'

Why? Template strings give you a readable, concise syntax with proper newlines and string interpolation features.

// bad
function sayHi(name) {
  return 'How are you, ' + name + '?'
}
 
// bad
function sayHi(name) {
  return ['How are you, ', name, '?'].join()
}
 
// bad
function sayHi(name) {
  return `How are you, ${name}?`
}
 
// good
function sayHi(name) {
  return `How are you, ${name}?`
}

Why? Backslashes harm readability, thus they should only be present when necessary.

// bad
const foo = '\'this\' is "quoted"'
 
// good
const foo = '\'this\' is "quoted"'
const foo = `my name is '${name}'`

Why? An immediately invoked function expression is a single unit - wrapping both it, and its invocation parens, in parens, cleanly expresses this. Note that in a world with modules everywhere, you almost never need an IIFE.

// immediately-invoked function expression (IIFE)
;(function () {
  console.log('Welcome to the Internet. Please follow me.')
})()

ECMA-262 defines a block as a list of statements. A function declaration is not a statement. Read ECMA-262’s note on this issue.

// bad
if (currentUser) {
  function test() {
    console.log('Nope.')
  }
}
 
// good
let test
if (currentUser) {
  test = () => console.log('Yup.')
}

// bad
function foo(name, options, arguments) {
  // ...
}
 
// good
function foo(name, options, args) {
  // ...
}

Why? ... is explicit about which arguments you want pulled. Plus, rest arguments are a real Array, and not merely Array-like like arguments.

// bad
function concatenateAll() {
  const args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments)
  return args.join('')
}
 
// good
function concatenateAll(...args) {
  return args.join('')
}

// really bad
function handleThings(opts) {
  // No! We shouldn’t mutate function arguments.
  // Double bad: if opts is falsy it'll be set to an object which may
  // be what you want but it can introduce subtle bugs.
  opts = opts || {}
  // ...
}
 
// still bad
function handleThings(opts) {
  if (opts === void 0) {
    opts = {}
  }
  // ...
}
 
// good
function handleThings(opts = {}) {
  // ...
}

Why? They are confusing to reason about.

var b = 1
 
// bad
function count(a = b++) {
  console.log(a)
}
count() // 1
count() // 2
count(3) // 3
count() // 3

// bad
function handleThings(opts = {}, name) {
  // ...
}
 
// good
function handleThings(name, opts = {}) {
  // ...
}

Why? Creating a function in this way evaluates a string similarly to eval(), which opens vulnerabilities.

// bad
const add = new Function('a', 'b', 'return a + b')
 
// still bad
const subtract = Function('a', 'b', 'return a - b')

// bad
const f = function () {}
const g = function () {}
const h = function () {}
 
// good
const x = function () {}
const y = function a() {}

Why? Manipulating objects passed in as parameters can cause unwanted variable side effects in the original caller.

// bad
function f1(obj) {
  obj.key = 1
}
 
// good
function f2(obj) {
  const key = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, 'key') ? obj.key : 1
}

Why? It’s cleaner, you don’t need to supply a context, and you can not easily compose new with apply.

// bad
const x = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
console.log.apply(console, x)
 
// good
const x = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
console.log(...x)
 
// bad
new (Function.prototype.bind.apply(Date, [null, 2016, 8, 5]))()
 
// good
new Date(...[2016, 8, 5])

// bad
function foo(bar, baz, quux) {
  // ...
}
 
// good
function foo(bar, baz, quux) {
  // ...
}
 
// bad
console.log(foo, bar, baz)
 
// good
console.log(foo, bar, baz)

Why? It creates a version of the function that executes in the context of this, which is usually what you want, and is a more concise syntax.

Why not? If you have a fairly complicated function, you might move that logic out into its own function declaration.

// bad
;[1, 2, 3]
  .map(function (x) {
    const y = x + 1
    return x * y
  })
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(x => {
    const y = x + 1
    return x * y
  })

expression without side effects, omit the braces and use the implicit return. Otherwise, keep the braces and use a return statement.

Why? Syntactic sugar. It reads well when multiple functions are chained together.

// bad
;[1, 2, 3]
  .map(number => {
    const nextNumber = number + 1`A string containing the ${nextNumber}.`
  })
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(number => `A string containing the ${number}.`)
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(number => {
    const nextNumber = number + 1
    return `A string containing the ${nextNumber}.`
  })
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map((number, index) => ({
    [index]: number,
  }))
 
// No implicit return with side effects
function foo(callback) {
  const val = callback()
  if (val === true) {
    // Do something if callback returns true
  }
}
 
let bool = false
 
// bad
foo(() => (bool = true))
 
// good
foo(() => {
  bool = true
})

Why? It shows clearly where the function starts and ends.

// bad
;['get', 'post', 'put']
  .map(httpMethod =>
    Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(httpMagicObjectWithAVeryLongName, httpMethod),
  )
 
  [
    // good
    ('get', 'post', 'put')
  ].map(httpMethod =>
    Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(httpMagicObjectWithAVeryLongName, httpMethod),
  )

Why? Less visual clutter.

// bad
;[1, 2, 3]
  .map(x => x * x)
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(x => x * x)
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(
    number =>
      `A long string with the ${number}. It’s so long that we don’t want it to take up space on the .map line!`,
  )
 
  [
    // bad
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(x => {
    const y = x + 1
    return x * y
  })
 
  [
    // good
    (1, 2, 3)
  ].map(x => {
    const y = x + 1
    return x * y
  })

Why? class syntax is more concise and easier to reason about.

// bad
function Queue(contents = []) {
  this.queue = [...contents]
}
 
Queue.prototype.pop = function () {
  const value = this.queue[0]
  this.queue.splice(0, 1)
  return value
}
 
// good
class Queue {
  constructor(contents = []) {
    this.queue = [...contents]
  }
 
  pop() {
    const value = this.queue[0]
    this.queue.splice(0, 1)
    return value
  }
}

Why? It is a built-in way to inherit prototype functionality without breaking instanceof.

// bad
const inherits = require('inherits')
 
function PeekableQueue(contents) {
  Queue.apply(this, contents)
}
 
inherits(PeekableQueue, Queue)
 
PeekableQueue.prototype.peek = function () {
  return this.queue[0]
}
 
// good
class PeekableQueue extends Queue {
  peek() {
    return this.queue[0]
  }
}

// bad
Jedi.prototype.jump = function () {
  this.jumping = true
  return true
}
 
Jedi.prototype.setHeight = function (height) {
  this.height = height
}
 
const luke = new Jedi()
luke.jump() // => true
luke.setHeight(20) // => undefined
 
// good
class Jedi {
  jump() {
    this.jumping = true
    return this
  }
 
  setHeight(height) {
    this.height = height
    return this
  }
}
 
const luke = new Jedi()
 
luke.jump().setHeight(20)

class Jedi {
  constructor({ name = 'no name' } = {}) {
    this.name = name
  }
 
  getName() {
    return this.name
  }
 
  toString() {
    return `Jedi - ${this.getName()}`
  }
}

// bad
class Jedi {
  constructor() {}
 
  getName() {
    return this.name
  }
}
 
// bad
class Rey extends Jedi {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args)
  }
}
 
// good
class Rey extends Jedi {
  constructor(...args) {
    super(...args)
 
    this.name = 'Rey'
  }
}

// bad
const luke = new Jedi()
 
// good
const luke = new Jedi()

Why? Duplicate class member declarations will silently prefer the last one - having duplicates is almost certainly a bug.

// bad
class Foo {
  bar() {
    return 1
  }
  bar() {
    return 2
  }
}
 
// good
class Foo {
  bar() {
    return 1
  }
}

Why? Modules are the future, let’s start using the future now.

// bad
const GrindCodeStyle = require('./GrindCodeStyle')
module.exports = GrindCodeStyle.es6
 
// still bad
const { es6 } = require('./GrindCodeStyle')
export { es6 }
 
// good
import { es6 } from './GrindCodeStyle'
export { es6 }

// bad
import * as GrindCodeStyle from './GrindCodeStyle'
 
// good
import GrindCodeStyle from './GrindCodeStyle'

Why? Although the one-liner is concise, having one clear way to import and one clear way to export makes things consistent.

// bad
// filename es6.js
export { es6 as default } from './GrindCodeStyle'
 
// good
// filename es6.js
import { es6 } from './GrindCodeStyle'
export { es6 }

Why? Having multiple lines that import from the same path can make code harder to maintain.

// bad
import foo from 'foo'
 
// … some other imports … //
import { named1, named2 } from 'foo'
 
// good
import foo, { named1, named2 } from 'foo'
 
// good
import foo, { named1, named2 } from 'foo'

Why? Mutation should be avoided in general, but in particular when exporting mutable bindings. While this technique may be needed for some special cases, in general, only constant references should be exported.

// bad
let foo = 3
export { foo }
 
// good
const foo = 3
export { foo }
 
// best
export const foo = 3

// bad
export default function foo() {}
 
// good
export function foo() {}

Why? Since imports are hoisted, keeping them all at the top prevents surprising behavior.

// bad
import foo from 'foo'
foo.init()
 
import bar from 'bar'
 
// good
import foo from 'foo'
import bar from 'bar'
 
foo.init()

Why? The curly braces follow the same indentation rules as every other curly brace block in the style guide.

// bad
import { longNameA, longNameB, longNameC, longNameD, longNameE } from 'module'
 
// good
import { longNameA, longNameB, longNameC, longNameD, longNameE } from 'module'

Use map() / every() / filter() / find() / findIndex() / reduce() / some() / … to iterate over arrays, and Object.keys() / Object.values() / Object.entries() to produce arrays so you can iterate over objects.

const numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
 
// bad
let sum = 0
numbers.forEach(num => {
  sum += num
})
sum === 15
 
// good
let sum = 0
for (const num of numbers) {
  sum += num
}
sum === 15
 
// best (use the functional force)
const sum = numbers.reduce((total, num) => total + num, 0)
sum === 15
 
// bad
const increasedByOne = []
for (let i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
  increasedByOne.push(numbers[i] + 1)
}
 
// bad
const increasedByOne = []
numbers.forEach(num => {
  increasedByOne.push(num + 1)
})
 
// good
const increasedByOne = []
for (const num of numbers) {
  increasedByOne.push(num + 1)
}
 
// best (keeping it functional)
const increasedByOne = numbers.map(num => num + 1)

const luke = {
  jedi: true,
  age: 28,
}
 
// bad
const isJedi = luke['jedi']
 
// good
const isJedi = luke.jedi

const luke = {
  jedi: true,
  age: 28,
}
 
function getProp(prop) {
  return luke[prop]
}
 
const isJedi = getProp('jedi')

// bad
const binary = Math.pow(2, 10)
 
// good
const binary = 2 ** 10

// bad
superPower = new SuperPower()
 
// good
const superPower = new SuperPower()

Why? It’s easier to add new variable declarations this way, and you never have to worry about swapping out a ; for a , or introducing punctuation-only diffs. You can also step through each declaration with the debugger, instead of jumping through all of them at once.

// bad
const items = getItems(),
  goSportsTeam = true,
  dragonball = 'z'
 
// bad
// (compare to above, and try to spot the mistake)
const items = getItems(),
  goSportsTeam = true
dragonball = 'z'
 
// good
const items = getItems()
const goSportsTeam = true
const dragonball = 'z'

Why? This is helpful when later on you might need to assign a variable depending on one of the previous assigned variables.

// bad
let i,
  len,
  dragonball,
  items = getItems(),
  goSportsTeam = true
 
// bad
let i
const items = getItems()
let dragonball
const goSportsTeam = true
let len
 
// good
const goSportsTeam = true
const items = getItems()
let dragonball
let i
let length

Why? let and const are block scoped and not function scoped.

// bad - unnecessary function call
function checkName(hasName) {
  const name = getName()
 
  if (hasName === 'test') {
    return false
  }
 
  if (name === 'test') {
    this.setName('')
    return false
  }
 
  return name
}
 
// good
function checkName(hasName) {
  if (hasName === 'test') {
    return false
  }
 
  const name = getName()
 
  if (name === 'test') {
    this.setName('')
    return false
  }
 
  return name
}

Why? Chaining variable assignments creates implicit global variables.

// bad
;(function example() {
  // JavaScript interprets this as
  // let a = ( b = ( c = 1 ) )
  // The let keyword only applies to variable a; variables b and c become
  // global variables.
  let a = (= c = 1)
})()
 
console.log(a) // throws ReferenceError
console.log(b) // 1
console.log(c)(
  // 1
 
  // good
  (function example() {
    let a = 1
    let b = a
    let c = a
  })(),
)
 
console.log(a) // throws ReferenceError
console.log(b) // throws ReferenceError
console.log(c) // throws ReferenceError
 
// the same applies for `const`

Temporal Dead Zones (TDZ). It’s important to know why typeof is no longer safe.

// we know this wouldn’t work (assuming there
// is no notDefined global variable)
function example() {
  console.log(notDefined) // => throws a ReferenceError
}
 
// creating a variable declaration after you
// reference the variable will work due to
// variable hoisting. Note: the assignment
// value of `true` is not hoisted.
function example() {
  console.log(declaredButNotAssigned) // => undefined
  var declaredButNotAssigned = true
}
 
// the interpreter is hoisting the variable
// declaration to the top of the scope,
// which means our example could be rewritten as:
function example() {
  let declaredButNotAssigned
  console.log(declaredButNotAssigned) // => undefined
  declaredButNotAssigned = true
}
 
// using const and let
function example() {
  console.log(declaredButNotAssigned) // => throws a ReferenceError
  console.log(typeof declaredButNotAssigned) // => throws a ReferenceError
  const declaredButNotAssigned = true
}

function example() {
  console.log(anonymous) // => undefined
 
  anonymous() // => TypeError anonymous is not a function
 
  var anonymous = function () {
    console.log('anonymous function expression')
  }
}

function example() {
  console.log(named) // => undefined
 
  named() // => TypeError named is not a function
 
  superPower() // => ReferenceError superPower is not defined
 
  var named = function superPower() {
    console.log('Flying')
  }
}
 
// the same is true when the function name
// is the same as the variable name.
function example() {
  console.log(named) // => undefined
 
  named() // => TypeError named is not a function
 
  var named = function named() {
    console.log('named')
  }
}

function example() {
  superPower() // => Flying
 
  function superPower() {
    console.log('Flying')
  }
}

JavaScript Scoping & Hoisting by Ben Cherry.

Conditional statements such as the if statement evaluate their expression using coercion with the ToBoolean abstract method and always follow these simple rules:

  • Objects evaluate to true
  • Undefined evaluates to false
  • Null evaluates to false
  • Booleans evaluate to the value of the boolean
  • Numbers evaluate to false if +0, -0, or NaN, otherwise true
  • Strings evaluate to false if an empty string '', otherwise true
if ([0] && []) {
  // true
  // an array (even an empty one) is an object, objects will evaluate to true
}

// bad
if (isValid === true) {
  // ...
}
 
// good
if (isValid) {
  // ...
}
 
// bad
if (name) {
  // ...
}
 
// good
if (name !== '') {
  // ...
}
 
// bad
if (collection.length) {
  // ...
}
 
// good
if (collection.length > 0) {
  // ...
}

For more information see Truth Equality and JavaScript by Angus Croll.

Why? Lexical declarations are visible in the entire switch block but only get initialized when assigned, which only happens when its case is reached. This causes problems when multiple case clauses attempt to define the same thing.

// bad
switch (foo) {
  case 1:
    let x = 1
    break
  case 2:
    const y = 2
    break
  case 3:
    function f() {
      // ...
    }
    break
  default:
    class C {}
}
 
// good
switch (foo) {
  case 1: {
    let x = 1
    break
  }
  case 2: {
    const y = 2
    break
  }
  case 3: {
    function f() {
      // ...
    }
    break
  }
  case 4:
    bar()
    break
  default: {
    class C {}
  }
}

// bad
const foo = a ? a : b
const bar = c ? true : false
const baz = c ? false : true
 
// good
const foo = a || b
const bar = !!c
const baz = !c

// bad
if (test) return false
 
// bad
if (test) return false
 
// still bad
if (test) {
  return false
}
 
// good
if (test) {
  return false
}
 
// bad
function foo() {
  return false
}
 
// good
function bar() {
  return false
}

// bad
if (test) {
  thing1()
  thing2()
} else {
  thing3()
}
 
// good
if (test) {
  thing1()
  thing2()
} else {
  thing3()
}

// bad
if (
  (foo === 123 || bar === 'abc') &&
  doesItLookGoodWhenItBecomesThatLong() &&
  isThisReallyHappening()
) {
  thing1()
}
 
// bad
if (foo === 123 && bar === 'abc') {
  thing1()
}
 
// bad
if (foo === 123 && bar === 'abc') {
  thing1()
}
 
// good
if (
  (foo === 123 || bar === 'abc') &&
  doesItLookGoodWhenItBecomesThatLong() &&
  isThisReallyHappening()
) {
  thing1()
}
 
// good
if (foo === 123 && bar === 'abc') {
  thing1()
}
 
// good
if (foo === 123 && bar === 'abc') {
  thing1()
}
 
// good
if (foo === 123 && bar === 'abc') {
  thing1()
}

// bad
// make() returns a new element
// based on the passed in tag name
//
// @param {String} tag
// @return {Element} element
function make(tag) {
  // ...
  return element
}
 
// good
/**
 * make() returns a new element
 * based on the passed-in tag name
 */
function make(tag) {
  // ...
  return element
}

// bad
const active = true // is current tab
 
// good
// is current tab
const active = true
 
// bad
function getType() {
  console.log('fetching type...')
  // set the default type to 'no type'
  const type = this.type || 'no type'
 
  return type
}
 
// good
function getType() {
  console.log('fetching type...')
 
  // set the default type to 'no type'
  const type = this.type || 'no type'
 
  return type
}
 
// also good
function getType() {
  // set the default type to 'no type'
  const type = this.type || 'no type'
 
  return type
}

// bad
//is current tab
const active = true
 
// good
// is current tab
const active = true
 
// bad
/**
 *make() returns a new element
 *based on the passed-in tag name
 */
function make(tag) {
  // ...
  return element
}
 
// good
/**
 * make() returns a new element
 * based on the passed-in tag name
 */
function make(tag) {
  // ...
  return element
}

Use // FIXME: to annotate problems.

class Calculator extends Abacus {
  constructor() {
    super()
 
    // FIXME: shouldn’t use a global here
    total = 0
  }
}

Use // TODO: to annotate solutions to problems.

class Calculator extends Abacus {
  constructor() {
    super()
 
    // TODO: total should be configurable by an options param
    this.total = 0
  }
}

// bad
function foo() {
∙∙∙∙let name
}
 
// bad
function bar() {
let name
}
 
// good
function baz() {
let name
}

// bad
function test() {
  console.log('test')
}
 
// good
function test() {
  console.log('test')
}
 
// bad
dog.set('attr', {
  age: '1 year',
  breed: 'Bernese Mountain Dog',
})
 
// good
dog.set('attr', {
  age: '1 year',
  breed: 'Bernese Mountain Dog',
})

// bad
if (isJedi) {
  fight()
}
 
// good
if (isJedi) {
  fight()
}
 
// bad
function fight() {
  console.log('Swooosh!')
}
 
// good
function fight() {
  console.log('Swooosh!')
}

// bad
const x = y + 5
 
// good
const x = y + 5

// bad
import { es6 } from './GrindCodeStyle'
// ...
export { es6 }
// bad
import { es6 } from './GrindCodeStyle'
// ...
export { es6 }
// good
import { es6 } from './AirbnbStyleGuide'
// ...
export default es6

// bad
$('#items').find('.selected').highlight().end().find('.open').updateCount()
 
// bad
$('#items').find('.selected').highlight().end().find('.open').updateCount()
 
// good
$('#items').find('.selected').highlight().end().find('.open').updateCount()
 
// bad
const leds = stage
  .selectAll('.led')
  .data(data)
  .enter()
  .append('svg:svg')
  .classed('led', true)
  .attr('width', (radius + margin) * 2)
  .append('svg:g')
  .attr('transform', `translate(${radius + margin},${radius + margin})`)
  .call(tron.led)
 
// good
const leds = stage
  .selectAll('.led')
  .data(data)
  .enter()
  .append('svg:svg')
  .classed('led', true)
  .attr('width', (radius + margin) * 2)
  .append('svg:g')
  .attr('transform', `translate(${radius + margin},${radius + margin})`)
  .call(tron.led)
 
// good
const leds = stage.selectAll('.led').data(data)

// bad
if (foo) {
  return bar
}
return baz
 
// good
if (foo) {
  return bar
}
 
return baz
 
// bad
const obj = {
  foo() {},
  bar() {},
}
return obj
 
// good
const obj = {
  foo() {},
 
  bar() {},
}
 
return obj
 
// bad
const arr = [function foo() {}, function bar() {}]
return arr
 
// good
const arr = [function foo() {}, function bar() {}]
 
return arr
  • Only classes should be padded, do not pad functions or switch blocks with blank lines.
// bad
function bar() {
  console.log(foo)
}
 
// good
function bar() {
  console.log(foo)
}
 
// bad
if (baz) {
  console.log(qux)
} else {
  console.log(foo)
}
 
// good
if (baz) {
  console.log(qux)
} else {
  console.log(foo)
}
 
// bad
class Foo {
  constructor(bar) {
    this.bar = bar
  }
}
 
// good
class Foo {
  constructor(bar) {
    this.bar = bar
  }
}

// bad
function bar(foo) {
  return foo
}
 
// good
function bar(foo) {
  return foo
}
 
// bad
if (foo) {
  console.log(foo)
}
 
// good
if (foo) {
  console.log(foo)
}

// bad
const foo = [1, 2, 3]
console.log(foo[0])
 
// good
const foo = [1, 2, 3]
console.log(foo[0])

// bad
foo[0]
 
// good
foo[0]
 
// bad
foo['data-attr']
 
// good
foo['data-attr']

// bad
const foo = []
 
// bad
const foo = []
 
// good
const foo = []

// bad
const foo = { clark: 'kent' }
 
// good
const foo = { clark: 'kent' }

// bad
const foo = {}
 
// good
const foo = {}

Why? This ensures readability and maintainability.

// bad
const foo =
  jsonData &&
  jsonData.foo &&
  jsonData.foo.bar &&
  jsonData.foo.bar.baz &&
  jsonData.foo.bar.baz.quux &&
  jsonData.foo.bar.baz.quux.xyzzy
 
// good
const foo =
  jsonData &&
  jsonData.foo &&
  jsonData.foo.bar &&
  jsonData.foo.bar.baz &&
  jsonData.foo.bar.baz.quux &&
  jsonData.foo.bar.baz.quux.xyzzy
 
// bad
fetch('https://airbnb.com/', { method: 'POST', body: { name: 'John' } })
  .then(() => console.log('Congratulations!'))
  .catch(err => console.log('You have failed this city.', err))
 
// good
fetch('https://airbnb.com/', {
  method: 'POST',
  body: { name: 'John' },
})
  .then(() => console.log('Congratulations!'))
  .catch(err => console.log('You have failed this city.', err))

// bad
const story = [once, upon, aTime]
 
// good
const story = [once, upon, aTime]
 
// bad
const hero = {
  firstName: 'Ada',
  lastName: 'Lovelace',
  birthYear: 1815,
  superPower: 'computers',
}
 
// good
const hero = {
  firstName: 'Ada',
  lastName: 'Lovelace',
  birthYear: 1815,
  superPower: 'computers',
}

It’s up to you whether you use a trailing comma, however you should be consistent.

// bad
;(function () {
  const name = 'Skywalker'
  return name
})()(
  // good
  (function () {
    const name = 'Skywalker'
    return name
  })(),
)

// => this.reviewScore = 9
 
// bad
const totalScore = this.reviewScore + '' // invokes this.reviewScore.valueOf()
 
// bad
const totalScore = this.reviewScore.toString() // isn’t guaranteed to return a string
 
// good
const totalScore = String(this.reviewScore)

Use Number for type casting and parseInt always with a radix for parsing strings.

const inputValue = '4'
 
// bad
const val = new Number(inputValue)
 
// bad
const val = +inputValue
 
// bad
const val = inputValue >> 0
 
// bad
const val = parseInt(inputValue)
 
// good
const val = Number(inputValue)
 
// good
const val = Number.parseInt(inputValue, 10)

If for whatever reason you are doing something wild and parseInt is your bottleneck and need to use Bitshift for performance reasons, leave a comment explaining why and what you’re doing.

// good
/**
 * parseInt was the reason my code was slow.
 * Bitshifting the String to coerce it to a
 * Number made it a lot faster.
 */
const val = inputValue >> 0

Be careful when using bitshift operations. Numbers are represented as 64-bit values, but bitshift operations always return a 32-bit integer (source). Bitshift can lead to unexpected behavior for integer values larger than 32 bits. Discussion. Largest signed 32-bit Int is 2,147,483,647:

2147483647 >> 0 // => 2147483647
2147483648 >> 0 // => -2147483648
2147483649 >> 0 // => -2147483647
const age = 0
 
// bad
const hasAge = new Boolean(age)
 
// bad
const hasAge = Boolean(age)
 
// bad
const hasAge = !!age
 
// good
const hasAge = age > 0

// bad
function q() {
  // ...
}
 
// good
function query() {
  // ...
}

// bad
const OBJEcttsssss = {}
const this_is_my_object = {}
function c() {}
 
// good
const thisIsMyObject = {}
function thisIsMyFunction() {}

// bad
function user(options) {
  this.name = options.name
}
 
const bad = new user({
  name: 'nope',
})
 
// good
class User {
  constructor(options) {
    this.name = options.name
  }
}
 
const good = new User({
  name: 'yup',
})

Function#bind.

// bad
function foo() {
  const self = this
  return function () {
    console.log(self)
  }
}
 
// bad
function foo() {
  const that = this
  return function () {
    console.log(that)
  }
}
 
// good
function foo() {
  return () => {
    console.log(this)
  }
}

// file 1 contents
export class CheckBox {
  // ...
}
// file 2 contents
export function fortyTwo() {
  return 42
}
 
// file 3 contents
export function insideDirectory() {}
 
// in some other file
// bad
import { CheckBox } from './checkBox' // PascalCase import/export, camelCase filename
import { fortyTwo } from './FortyTwo' // PascalCase filename, camelCase import/export
import { insideDirectory } from './InsideDirectory' // PascalCase filename, camelCase import/export
 
// bad
import { CheckBox } from './check_box' // PascalCase import/export, snake_case filename
import { fortyTwo } from './forty_two' // snake_case filename, camelCase import/export
import { insideDirectory } from './inside_directory' // snake_case file, camelCase export
import { insideDirectory } from './insideDirectory/index' // requiring the index file explicitly
 
// good
import { CheckBox } from './CheckBox' // PascalCase export/import/filename
import { fortyTwo } from './fortyTwo' // camelCase export/import/filename
import { insideDirectory } from './insideDirectory' // camelCase export/import/directory name/implicit "index"
// ^ supports both insideDirectory.js and insideDirectory/index.js

export function makeStyleGuide() {
  // ...
}

export const GrindCodeStyle = {
  es6: {},
}

// bad
import { SMSContainer } from './containers/SMSContainer'
 
// bad
const HTTPRequests = [
  // ...
]
 
// good
import { SmsContainer } from './containers/SMSContainer'
 
// bad (only classes should be PascalCase)
const HttpRequests = [
  // ...
]
 
// good
const httpRequests = [
  // ...
]
 
// best
import { TextMessageContainer } from './containers/TextMessageContainer'
 
// best
const requests = [
  // ...
]

// bad
if (!dragon.age()) {
  return false
}
 
// good
if (!dragon.hasAge()) {
  return false
}

The Standard Library contains utilities that are functionally broken but remain for legacy reasons.

Why? The global isNaN coerces non-numbers to numbers, returning true for anything that coerces to NaN. If this behavior is desired, make it explicit.

// bad
isNaN('1.2') // false
isNaN('1.2.3') // true
 
// good
Number.isNaN('1.2.3') // false
Number.isNaN(Number('1.2.3')) // true

Why? The global isFinite coerces non-numbers to numbers, returning true for anything that coerces to a finite number. If this behavior is desired, make it explicit.

// bad
isFinite('2e3') // true
 
// good
Number.isFinite('2e3') // false
Number.isFinite(parseInt('2e3', 10)) // true
Edit